What I Think of This Headline

“It truly a shame that in the wake of the most recent terrorist attack in San Bernardino, California, that the left is calling it an issue of gun control, rather than calling it what it is. What happened in San Bernardino is a terrorist attack perpetrated by radical Islamist.”

“I am also appalled by the left saying that the various calls for prayer by people of faith isn’t enough. All of those who said that prayer isn’t enough, I have one question for you, how much time have you spent in prayer asking for God to soften the hearts of the Islamic terrorist? How much time have you spent on your knees asking God to bring this to an end? You can’t complain that prayer isn’t working if you are not actually praying yourself”

“The Bible is clear that in Deuteronomy chapter 32, one person praying can put a thousand dark angels to flight; two people praying fervent prayers can put ten thousand to flight, so imagine the power of all the people of God praying to God for peace and for the welfare of this nation.”

“If you haven’t tried prayer, don’t knock it.”

 

A Firewall is Needed Against Militant Islam

by Archbishop Council Nedd II

What’s a firewall? It’s an impenetrable barrier meant to stop an undesirable action.

In politics, consider the example of the 1988 United States presidential race.  After several embarrassing defeats in early primaries, then-Vice President George H.W. Bush’s campaign manager announced to staff and supporters that South Carolina and its influential primary would be the firewall for the Bush campaign.

With workers and volunteers focused and dug in, working harder than ever so their candidate would prevail, the firewall succeeded and Bush handily defeated his challengers.  The rest, as they say, is history.  Bush went on to win his party’s nomination and eventually became the 41st president of the United States.

Similarly, for human rights reasons, it is necessary to build a firewall to stop the international expansion of radical Islam.  Wholly different from peaceful followers of the Muslim faith, the adherents of radical Islam threaten the free expression of faith worldwide because they refuse to tolerate any religious views but their own.

The firewall should be on the African continent.

Most of the world now knows about the radical Islamist organization Boko Haram. It is responsible for kidnappings of young girls and the killing of thousands of innocents in the name of Allah. They recently kidnapped the wife of Cameroon’s vice prime minister! Likewise, the world watched with a mix of horror, amazement and fear as the ISIS army recently blitzkrieged through Iraq and Syria.  Entire towns were slaughtered in the quest to establish a new and unimpeded Sharia law-based caliphate.

By many estimates, Nigeria and Syria may be lost to radical Islam.  That doesn’t mean curtailing radical Islam is still not a cause worth fighting for elsewhere.  A firewall can still be erected, and is worth the effort.

It’s not a holy war, but a rational response to a humanitarian crisis.

Kenya should be that firewall.

A massacre at the Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya in September of 2013 was perpetrated by an Islamist group equally as treacherous as Boko Haram or ISIS, the Somalia-based Al-Shabaab.  It frightens not only Kenyans, but Christians such as myself who track the spread of radical Islam as I minister my faith in countries with sizable Muslim populations.

Why should the Christian world care about the spread of radicalism into Kenya? What might happen if Kenya is overrun?

If militant Islam spreads into Kenya, nations throughout the rest of the continent are likely to be lost in relatively short succession. South Africa may hold out, but it would eventually succumb as well.

We are already witnessing something akin to the genocide of Christians around the world.  If things continue on their current pace and the entire African continent is lost to intolerant radicalism, we might find that even the America we know will become isolated and under a full assault within the span of a generation.

If we who purport to be Christians truly believe in the faith of our fathers, we should take a stand for our brothers in Christ and defend our historic and God-given faith. Throughout history, Christians have rallied when our faith was under fire.  This is such a time.

Again, this is not a call to holy war.  It’s not a modern-day crusade.  It’s the need for tolerant people to collectively say “no” to radicals who want to impose their will upon others by any and all means — including heinous acts of violence.

When Boko Haram launched Christmas Day attacks on churchgoers, when ISIS wiped out a 2,000-year-old Christian community and when Ethiopia, one of the most storied of Christian nations, is now 55 percent Muslim in part due to forced conversions, it’s time to act.  When a British soldier can be slaughtered in the streets of England by Islamists trying to make a name for themselves, it’s time for Christians to say “stop right there!”

Africa, and Kenya in particular, must be the firewall that prevents radical Islamist expansion.

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Archbishop Council Nedd II is a member of the national advisory council of the Project 21 black leadership network. He is also the founder of In God We Trust, an organization established to push back against the secular tide in this country that is seeking to remove God from the fabric of American life. Comments may be sent to Project21@nationalcenter.org .

Published by the National Center for Public Policy Research. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. New Visions Commentaries reflect the views of their author, and not necessarily those of Project 21, other Project 21 members, or the National Center for Public Policy Research, its board or staff.

Let’s Unite and Put ISIS to Flight

by Archbishop Council Nedd II

Having studied and taught history, I tend to look at things with a slightly longer view and in a broader context than most people. Most people tend to view the political world map as always having looked the way it does, but that clearly is not the case. The fact is that every couple of generations the geopolitical divisions change in a fairly dramatic way.

Most of these geopolitical changes, obviously, occur as a result of war or some armed conflict. ISIS has vowed to be the precipitating force for the next major geopolitical changes on the world map. ISIS is quickly encroaching on Jordan and has vowed to take control of the Holy Land. ISIS has also vowed to recapture Spain in the name of Islam.

If that’s not enough, not to be outdone by the ISIS newcomers, al-Qaeda has decided to focus its efforts on a conquest of the entire Indian subcontinent, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nepal. Just five years ago, such exaggerated ambitions would have been considered little more than an absurd bluster by a small group seeking media attention. However, after viewing the ease with which ISIS has captured large swaths of northern Iraq and northern Syria, we all are right to be concerned.

The West and the Christian world should similarly be concerned that some of our citizens swiftly flocked to Syria and Iraq to assist ISIS in its efforts.

What should the United States do next? Recently I wrote an article calling for Kenya to be the firewall against Islam in Africa. However, the struggle in Kenya is only one front in this war against ISIS butchers, who will most assuredly stop at nothing in their effort to impose their barbarous brand of Islam.

We need several firewalls, and prompt and decisive action by world leaders, in order to extinguish the threat that radical Islam poses to our way of life.

The West, its affected political allies in the region, corporations and Christians must unite to stop ISIS now. How, you may be asking? First, Jordan and Turkey must also serve as firewalls. Jordan is all that stands between ISIS and Israel. Turkey, a secular state and NATO member with which the U.S. shares some affinity, must also be protected. If Turkey were to somehow fall to ISIS it would be an immediate psychological defeat for Europe.

Nations must step up in several ways. Nations must refuse to purchase or refine oil from any oil fields ISIS captures, and must make every effort to liberate those fields. Also, countries should immediately revoke the citizenship of those who leave home to fight with ISIS against the civilized world. The United Nations or the U.S., acting unilaterally, must confront France about press reports that it has been paying ISIS ransoms for its kidnapped citizens, funds which essentially gave ISIS start-up funds for its reign of terror. There is a high level of discernment with banks; however, money-transfer companies such as Western Union, MoneyGram International and Xoom must be discriminating when transfering funds into ISIS, Boko Haram and Al Shabab strongholds.

Last, and certainly not the least important, Christians and Jews must unite in prayer for peace and safety. In Zechariah 2:5, the Lord promises that he will be a wall of fire around his city. We need to come together. Deuteronomy 32:30 says that one person can put one thousand enemies of God to flight and two can put ten thousand enemies to flight. Imagine the power of thousands coming together in prayer and unity to defeat the threat that ISIS poses to the people of God.

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Archbishop Council Nedd II is a member of the national advisory council of the Project 21 black leadership network. He is also the founder of In God We Trust, an organization established to push back against the secular tide in this country that is seeking to remove God from the fabric of American life. Comments may be sent to Project21@nationalcenter.org .

Published by the National Center for Public Policy Research. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. New Visions Commentaries reflect the views of their author, and not necessarily those of Project 21, other Project 21 members, or the National Center for Public Policy Research, its board or staff.