Rejoice and Glory in All Saints

Poor in Spirit is a odd term that gets misused by people with social or political agendas. The best way to understand the term, Poor in Spirit, isn’t as an indicator of quantity, but rather of awareness of dependency. Someone in poor health needs the help of doctors and caregivers. Someone truly poor in wealth, not only has little, but has so little that they could not survive without the resources and grace of a community… whether civil, familial or religious.

To learn more about this click here.

Vengeance is God’s — Not Ours

Vengeance may be fun to contemplate, but God doesn’t approve of it.  Or rather, he doesn’t of approve of us indulging in it.  The reason for this is that a desire for vengeance, or at least our human concept of it, actually serves to separate us from God. It runs entirely counter to everything God is and everything he stands for. Remember, God tells us that He is love.

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Only Luke Is With Me

Today we celebrate the feast day of St. Luke the Evangelist. He is called an evangelist because he wrote the third of the four New Testament Gospels. St. Luke also wrote the Book of the Acts of the Apostles, which comes just after the Gospels in the New Testament. Taken together, St. Luke’s Gospel and Acts form a continuous story of the birth of Christianity from the announcement of the birth of John the Baptist, to St. Paul’s imprisonment in Rome, in about 60 A.D.

St. Paul said, “Only Luke is with me”.  What’s the significance of this and what does he mean? … click here.

Jesus … Who Does He Think He Is?

By Bishop Council Nedd

Jesus in today’s story doesn’t go through any elaborate ritual like the great prophets Elijah and Elisha when they raised children from the dead. He doesn’t even mutter a brief prayer. At Nain, he offhandedly says to the corpse: “Okay, Kid, get up.”

And at the graveyard in Bethany, he basically strolls up to the newly opened tomb and hollers, “Lazarus, come out!”

Both of these events must have stunned the onlookers, and not just because of what he had done, but because of the way in which he did it. Raising people from the dead was one of the signs by which the Jews of the First Century expected to identify the Messiah. However, he didn’t perform the miracles in the way they expected the Messiah to perform them.

His approach left everyone asking… Who Does He Think He Is?