The Kelly File… Debate Critique

by Bishop Council Nedd

On Monday I was asked if I would be willing to appear on The Kelly File with Megyn Kelly.  I was asked to be on the Friday night show which would be an election critique and recap featuring pundits and regular Americans. I usually hate appearing on any sort of panel discussion.  For evidence of that, one need look no further than my last appearance on Sean Hannity’s show (but we don’t talk about that anymore).

Megyn KellyHowever, doing the Kelly File was enjoyable.  It’s very seldom that I go on television and I feel like there actually is iron sharpening iron.  However, that’s exactly what happened.  It’s usually punditry and sound bites.  I don’t actually recall what was said on the air and what wasn’t, as Megyn encouraged all of us to stay engaged through the breaks and that’s exactly what happened.

She apologized to me for not getting to the issue of faith during our discussion, but I understood.  However, I do hope there are more conversations about the role and importance of faith as we get closer to the election, while attacks on Christianity increase.

It is an important topic.

There are organized individuals in the country that want to rip up every cross by its roots and throw it in a wood pile for burning, be they secularists, atheists or radical Islamists.  I would like to see this crucial matter given more consideration, not just in the political discourse, but in the hearts of everyone who considers themselves a Christian or a person of faith.  In fact, it’s not merely an important topic.  It’s a topic with grave implications.

This is the first story I saw, when I turned on my Computer this morning…

“ISIS kidnaps more Christians. When will we put an end to this madness?”

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2015/08/07/more-christians-kidnapped-in-syria.html

As the chairman of In God We Trust, I will continue to fight, not just for the right of Christians to exist in America, but to remind people that the bounty of America comes from our creator.

 

Orwell Must Be Laughing in His Grave

“… some of the animals remembered–or thought they remembered–that the Sixth Commandment decreed ‘No animal shall kill any other animal.’ And though no one cared to mention it in the hearing of the pigs or the dogs, it was felt that the killings which had taken place did not square with this.”  George Orwell, Animal Farm, Ch. 8

Policy aside, the Supreme Court of the United States is behaving in the most capricious manner. I understand that most American have no understanding of what our Constitution and the Bill of Rights say, which is why no one is appalled by the whimsy of SCOTUS.

We are truly living in an Orwellian nightmare where his hyperbole is becoming our reality. Big Brother is watching everything we do. Now we have evolved into Animal Farm situation where our post literate culture is fine with the government redefining itself by fiat.

Why is this ok with everyone?  Is our Constitution and the separation of powers just a historical curiosity from America’s past?

 

Does America Hate God? Sound Off!!!

“No, I don’t think so. I’m pretty sure he’s not too thrilled with us though!” Mark Forrest– from Tarpon Springs, Florida

“I don’t think they do but morals and values are lacking in many but just by choice of denying the truth and God’s existence.” Elizabeth Hinga Mwangi — an educator from Kahawa, Nairobi, Kenya

 “No. Too many don’t understand God. He is not vengeful, not close minded, not mean. He-she-it loves us all. No matter what! If America hates God it’s because of the crazy evangelists that use His name to push their agenda. It turns off so many people!” Beth Sawyer Egan a retired musician living in Union Springs, Alabama

“America doesn’t hate God. But I hate people who use God to advance political agendas that are antithetical to the supposed teachings upon which their religion is based. I am just a man. I don’t pretend to know the answers to the profound questions of creation etc. and I am suspicious of those who claim to. Hate God? No. Hate exclusionary group think that holds one group of acolytes better than another (or themselves right and all others wrong)? Most definitely.” Danny Ingram — a Washington, DC music legend

“I’m an American, and I don’t hate God. I continue to be amazed by those who claim to be God’s followers while presuming to impose their narrow limits on God’s love and mercy for us.” Nancy Kane Maginn — friends with Dany Ingram

A Woman on the $20 Bill? Make Her an Entrepreneur

by David W. Almasi

There’s a campaign underway to remove President Andrew Jackson’s face from the $20 bill and replace it with a woman as a way of “promoting gender equality.”

The group Women on 20s wants Jackson’s portrait removed in time for the 2020 centennial of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote. They also, of course, want to “make our money more egalitarian, inclusive and an affirmation of American values.”

This group, however, doesn’t just want any woman. They want a woman of their own choosing. They will send President Barack Obama the specific woman they think should grace a future $20 bill. Civil rights icon Rosa Parks, abolitionist Harriet Tubman and former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt were selected through an online vote from their 15 top choices. A fourth, Wilma Mankiller, the first female elected as a Native American tribal leader, was added “by popular demand” and as an obvious statement about the harsh Native American policies during the Jackson presidency.

All of these candidates share the distinction of being feminist icons, well-known historical figures or both. If this must be done at all, why not make a bold choice — one that’s free of a political agenda?

Since it’s money, how about having the first woman immortalized on paper currency be the first female self-made millionaire in American history?

Madam C.J. Walker is that woman, and her inspiring story makes her an ideal candidate.

Born on a Louisiana plantation in 1867 to newly-freed slaves, the future Madam Walker was an orphan by the age of seven and hard at work in the cotton fields. Her situation improved only slightly after moving to St. Louis, where she made just $1.50 a day doing laundry and cooking meals.

This drudgery led to her losing her hair and discovering a cosmetic product that helped her grow it back. She got a job selling the product to others, and later started her own company to market her own similar product. Walker’s “Wonderful Hair Grower” grew from a product sold door-to-door to being offered in mail-order catalogs. It eventually became the flagship for a whole line of beauty products targeted toward the black community.

Walker persevered in a male-dominated era where separate-but-equal Jim Crow discrimination was the law of the land. She saw how other businesses ignored black customers, and she stepped in to fill the void and became a success.

At the same time, she created jobs and new wealth in the black American community. She founded institutions that educated tens of thousands of “Walker Agents” and built factories to make her products. In 1914, Walker told the National Negro Business League: “I am not merely satisfied in making money for myself, for I am endeavoring to provide employment for hundreds of women of my race.”

She also wasn’t stingy. Her philanthropic efforts built homes for the elderly, funded scholarships and helped build the YMCA in Indianapolis. Her inheritance helped foster the famed Harlem Renaissance.

She funded the newly-formed NAACP and National Conference on Lynching — lobbying President Woodrow Wilson herself late in her life to promote a federal ban on lynching.

The memories of Tubman, Parks and Roosevelt are already immortalized in statues, awards, street and highway names and buildings. Rosa Parks even has an asteroid named for her! Madam C.J. Walker was on a postage stamp in 1998, but all of the others, with the exception of Mankiller (who died in 2010), similarly had stamps issued in their honor.

Rather than just pushing a name people already know, making Madam C.J. Walker the new face of the $20 bill would be an inspired choice. It would honor a clever entrepreneur, job creator and philanthropist. It doesn’t simply fulfill a political agenda and potentially foster division.

Madam C.J. Walker is someone everyone should admire and a fine candidate to represent American women on our currency.

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David W. Almasi is Executive Director of the National Center for Public Policy Research. Comments may be sent to Project21@nationalcenter.org .

Published by the National Center for Public Policy Research. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. New Visions Commentaries reflect the views of their author, and not necessarily those of Project 21, other Project 21 members, or the National Center for Public Policy Research, its board or staff.